Diabetes and Gum Disease – What You Should Know.docx

If you are at risk of diabetes, or if you have already been diagnosed with it, there are some things you should know about gum disease. While you have probably heard of gum disease—whether it was on a commercial for dental floss or an ad for some other health product—you may not have ever considered w diabetes can increase your risk of developing gum disease.

If You Have Diabetes, You Need To Be Aware Of Your Risk 

Diabetes can contribute to your chances of developing gum disease. This occurs due to a few different factors, any one of which is troublesome by themselves.

Poor blood sugar levels are a common consequence of diabetes. Research has shown that people with elevated blood sugar levels will also be more likely to develop gum disease, and it will be more severe than if they did not have blood sugar issues. In addition, people with high blood sugar levels are more likely to lose teeth due to gum disease than other people are.

Another thing to keep in mind is the thickening of your blood vessels. This is a condition that can reduce the rate of blood flow in your body (including your gums). Less blood flow means less oxygen, less ability to transport away waste products, and fewer nutrients being delivered to the tissue. These factors increase the risk of gum disease because the gum tissue and bone are less likely to be able to resist infection.

Many diabetics have higher than normal levels of glucose. This is a sugar that some of the bacteria in your mouth use as a food source. More glucose means more of these bacteria; more of these bacteria means more of a chance of gum disease.

If you are a diabetic, you need to pay special attention to your oral hygiene in order to help fight off gum disease.

Please contact us if you have any questions about diabetes effect on your oral health.